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On This Day in Pink History… 7th February 2006, Stupid Girls was released

On This Day in Pink History… 7th February 2006, Stupid Girls was released

In 2006, Stupid Girls was released as the lead single from Pink’s fourth studio album, I’m Not Dead. The song was written by Pink, Billy Mann, Niklas Olovson and Robin Mortensen Lynch and produced by Billy Mann and MachoPsycho.

The single entered the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart at number twenty-four, the week’s highest debut and the highest debut of Pink’s career (later topped by her 2008 single, So What). It climbed to number thirteen, becoming Pink’s eighth top twenty single in the United States and her highest peaking single since “Just Like a Pill” (2002). Its peak on the Top 40 Mainstream airplay chart, however, did not match that of most of her previous singles. “Stupid Girls” remained on the Hot 100 for sixteen weeks, and it reached the top twenty on the Pop 100 and appeared on the Adult Top 40. It received airplay in nightclubs, peaking inside the top twenty on the Hot Dance Club Play chart. “Stupid Girls” was certified Gold by RIAA in February 2008.

The single was a bigger chart hit elsewhere—it reached number two on the Canadian Singles Chart, and on the Australian ARIA Singles Chart, it entered at number four and is certified gold for sales of over 35,000. It was ranked number thirty-ninth on ARIA’s top 100 singles of 2006 list. It also peaked at number four on the UK Singles Chart, becoming Pink’s highest charting single in the UK since “Feel Good Time” (2003). It reached the top ten in most countries in Europe.

“Stupid Girls” was nominated in the category of Best Female Pop Vocal Performance at the 2007 Grammy Awards.

The single was praised by Harry Potter author J. K. Rowling on her official website. She wrote, “‘Stupid Girls’, is the antidote-anthem for everything I had been thinking about women and thinness.” About.com praised the song and highlighted it: “she has rarely been as pointed in her socio-political views as in the hit “Stupid Girls” (…) “Stupid Girls” is musically a dance/hip hop gem.” Allmusic praised her delivery when she’s taunting and teasing this song and it was titled as one of the standouts on album. Entertainment Weekly noted that this song has some verve. The Guardian was less positive noting that her vocals are superficial as the starlets she attacks. LA Times wrote that this song fuses many genres greatly and called it “hilarious feminist romp.” Jon Pareles was favorable: “the pop-reggae of Stupid Girls snidely dismisses the bimbos she sees everywhere, though she apparently has studied their habits closely.” PopMatters was positive: “On “Stupid Girlz”, she rails against the idea that women have to choose between being smart and being sexy, as if the two are mutually exclusive. Pink makes the case that women can be all that and more—”Girls with ambition,” she sings, “That’s what I want to see”. She sounds bewildered and exasperated when she says, in the frequently quoted lines:

What happened to the dream of a girl president? She’s dancing in the video next to 50 Cent They travel in packs of two or three With their itsy bitsy doggies and their teenie weenie tees

What could have easily been a rant turns into an adept social critique. The way she sings it, the problem isn’t 50 Cent’s video, it’s the idea that dancing in the video is the extent of a woman’s aspirations. The bit about the “itsy bitsy doggies” suggests a disdain for elitism and excess that makes you wonder if Gwen Stefani’s “Rich Girl” made Pink see red. It’s got the same playfully articulate vibe as George Clinton’s “Some of My Best Jokes Are Friends”. By the way, for those keeping score, the United States is on its forty-third consecutive male president. Female presidents? Zilch. Female rump shakers in music videos? Countless. Don’t look now, but it seems like Pink’s got a point.” Sal Cinqeman was favorable, too: “As always, Pink’s ragged vocals are better than she’s often given credit for and there’s still a rebel sensibility, at least lyrically, on the catchy lead single “Stupid Girls” (“Where, oh where, have all the smart people gone?” she begs, lambasting “porno paparazzi girls”—which would have made for a more fun title—the way she took aim at Britney two albums ago).” Rolling Stone praised the collaboration with Lilth Fair and added that she takes on ‘stupid girls’ with these lyrics “What happened to the dream of a girl president?/She’s dancing in the video next to 50 Cent.” Feminist website Feminspire were considerably more critical, naming the song in 2014 as one of “the top ten most sexist songs that aren’t rap or hip hop from the last 20 years”. Author Noor Al-Sibai remarked that: “Pink shits on these women who are too stupid to break out of the chains of patriarchy by harshly judging their promiscuity and blaming them for ‘giving in’ to sexist tropes. Because obviously, women are to blame for their sexist objectification.”

Wikipedia

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On This Day in #PinkHistory… 4th February 2018, Pink performed the National Anthem at the Super Bowl

On This Day in #PinkHistory… 4th February 2018, Pink performed the National Anthem at the Super Bowl

Prior to Justin Timberlake playing the Super Bowl halftime show, Pink sang the national anthem, much to the delight of many Americans.

Although an impressive performance, some fans were left wondering why the singer was perhaps not performing at full capacity.

Before singing the song, Pink was seen spitting out something. Turns out, that was a throat lozenge (not gum as some believed), as the singer currently has the flu.

Responding to one critical Tweet (now deleted) saying Pink “sucked”, she wrote: “Yeah but at least I suck while singing our countries national anthem, and you just suck by yourself on a dirty couch.”

Pink also clarified that “It was a throat lozenge” adding: “All of your prayers and well wishes and candles got me through. Thank you for all of your love and support. We [emoji hear] you.”

Link

On This Day in Pink History… 1st February 2010, Pink took part in the We Are The World remake

On This Day in Pink History… 1st February 2010, Pink took part in the We Are The World remake

We Are the World 25 for Haiti” is a charity single recorded by the supergroup Artists for Haiti in 2010. It is a remake of the 1985 hit song “We Are the World”, which was written by American musicians Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie, and was recorded by USA for Africa to benefit famine relief in Africa. Initially, in late 2009, it had been suggested to Richie and Quincy Jones—producer of the original “We Are the World”—that a re-cut version of the song be re-released under the title “Live 25”. Following the magnitude 7.0 Mw earthquake in Haiti, which devastated the area and killed thousands of people, it was agreed that the song would be re-recorded by new artists, in the hope that it would reach a new generation and help benefit the people of Haiti.

The song was recorded in fourteen and a half hours by over eighty artists on February 1, 2010. It was produced by Quincy Jones, and executively produced by Lionel Richie, and Haitian-American musician Wyclef Jean. A music video directed by Paul Haggis was released to accompany and promote the song. The song was also recorded in Spanish by a Latin supergroup and was named Somos el Mundo. The song was directed by Emilio Estefan and his wife, Gloria Estefan.

The new version of the song was recorded on February 1, 2010, in a session lasting 14 hours. Eighty-five musicians were reportedly involved in the song’s recording, which was held in the same place as the original, at Henson Recording Studio on Beverly Boulevard in Los Angeles, California. Also similar to the 1985 process, some of the participating musicians were already in Los Angeles to attend an awards ceremony: the 52nd Grammy Awards. Jones said of the recording session, “It was a big challenge. It takes a serious army and serious emotional architecture. I’ve never seen such a diverse group of people, and they came for the right reasons.” The recording process brought together diverse artists, with the oldest being 83-year-old Tony Bennett and the youngest being 9-year-old Ethan Bortnick.

“We Are the World 25 for Haiti” debuted within the top 30 in multiple territories. “We Are the World 25 for Haiti” charted at number 27 on the Spanish Singles Chart on the charts. The song debuted at number 17 in New Zealand on the charts. “We Are the World 25 for Haiti” peaked within the top five, charting at number three in Norway on the charts; the chart’s position is currently the song’s highest charting international territory since its release. The song debuted at number 25 in France.

“We Are the World 25 for Haiti” charted at number two on the Billboard Hot 100, behind Kesha’s “Tik Tok”. “We Are the World 25 for Haiti” charted higher in its debut week than the original version, which entered the Billboard Hot 100 at number 21. According to Billboard, the song’s charting position stemmed mainly from download sales, with a reported 96% of the song’s charting being from such sales. Following the song’s debut during the Olympics, 246 radio stations sampled the song in the United States. Radio stations in New York expressed that they would play the song frequently to raise awareness of Haitian citizens in need. Other radio stations throughout the United States echoed similar responses on the song getting airplay.

The song also sold over 267,000 downloads in three days. “We Are the World 25 for Haiti” debuted at number eight on the Canadian Hot 100. The song also debuted at number six in Belgium Wallonia and Flanders, as well at debuting at number 17 in Sweden. The song also charted at number 28 in Denmark. The song entered Irish charts at number nine. In the song’s second week of release in Norway, “We Are the World 25 for Haiti” moved up two spaces, topping the chart. Unlike the song’s chart performance in territories like Norway, the song dropped four places on the Billboard Hot 100 to sixth place and stayed in the charts for only five weeks more.

Wikipedia

On This Day in Pink History 31st January 2010, Pink attended the Grammy Awards [VIDEO]

On This Day in Pink History 31st January 2010, Pink attended the Grammy Awards

In 2010, Pink performed Glitter in the Air at the Grammy Awards. The success of the performance lead to the song being released as a single.

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On This Day in Pink History… 26th January 2006, Stupid Girls music video was released

On This Day in Pink History… 26th January 2006, Stupid Girls music video was released

Stupid Girls was released as the first single from Pink’s fourth studio album, I’m Not Dead.

The music video was directed by Dave Meyers and premiered on MTV’s broadband channel Overdrive. Pink and Meyers shot the videos for both Stupid Girls and U + Ur Hand before he decision was made as to which would become the albums lead single.

Pink describes the video as “sick and twisted and insane”, and says of Meyers “He has an insane imagination. I don’t think everyone else is going to laugh, but just know that we all did.” Pink did all her own stunts for the video.

According to Barry Weiss, president of Zomba Music Group, executives at Pink’s label were reluctant to release the song as the album’s first single. They decided to release the video before issuing the song to radio, and 8.6 million people downloaded the video when it was made available on the internet. Zomba’s senior vice president of marketing Janet Kleinbaum said that radio programmers “went online to download the audio from the video in order to get it on radio”.

The video shows Pink as an angel and a demon who try to influence the future of a young girl. The angel shows her a series of images demonstrating the stupidity of current trends in female celebrity, and the images feature Pink in various roles, including a dancer in a 50 Cent video, a girl attempting to attract the attention of an instructor at the gym, a girl who uses her emergency inflatable breasts at a bowling alley, a girl at a tanning salon, a girl with purging disorder who considers calories “so not sexy”, an old woman in a pink tracksuit who looks as if she is trying too hard to look young, a girl getting plastic surgery, a girl making a sex tape, a girl washing her car and rubbing a facecloth and soap all over herself, and a girl who goes into what looks like a pet shop, buys an “itsy bitsy doggy” with the advertisement that it “stays younger longer”, and drives her car so carelessly while putting on makeup that she runs over two people. Pink also plays characters meant to represent the opposite of “stupid girls”, such as a female president and a girl winning a game of football. The video ends with the girl choosing a football (fitness), a computer (work), books (knowledge and adequate education), dance shoes (love), and a keyboard (leisure) over makeup (vanity) and a set of dolls (children) as she wants a normal life and the images are too overwhelming for her; the demon is defeated.

Some of the negatively portrayed characters in the video are parodies of young female celebrities such as Mary-Kate Olsen, who provides the basis for the Boho-chic dressing style of the girl who visits a Fred Segal clothing store. The redheaded girl who accidentally hits pedestrians with her car is a parody of Lindsay Lohan. The scene in which Pink washes a car in a bikini is a parody of similar scenes in the video for Jessica Simpson’s “These Boots Are Made for Walkin'” (2005) and a 2005 Carl’s Jr. television commercial featuring Paris Hilton. The digital video shots showing Pink in bed with a man parallel those in the Paris Hilton sex tape 1 Night in Paris. The scene where Pink portrays a blonde coming into a bathroom throwing up food in order to be skinny (portraying bulimia) is reported to be portraying Nicole Richie. Towards the end in the video, a middle-aged woman with leathery skin appears next to a hot pink Honda S2000, which is exactly the same car driven by Devon Aoki in the film 2 Fast 2 Furious.

The video debuted on the U.S. MTV Total Request Live countdown and peaked at number six; it remained on the countdown for fourteen days. The video was retired on the Poland version of MTV’s Total Request Live, and it won the MTV Video Music Award for Best Pop Video in August 2006. When she was receiving the award, Pink parodied Paris Hilton by talking in a higher pitched voice and acting overly excited. Nicole Richie co-presented the award.

Wikipedia

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