Tag Archives: Missundaztood

On This Day in Pink History… 29th August 2002, Pink attended the MTV Video Music Awards

On This Day in Pink History… 29th August 2002, Pink attended the MTV Video Music Awards

In August 2002, Pink attended the MTV Video Music Awards. She performed Just Like A Pill and won awards for Best Dance Video and Best Female Video for Get The Party Started She was also nominated for Best Pop Video but lost out to No Doubt’s Hey Baby.

On This Day in Pink History… 22nd July 2004, Pink played at Golden Stag Festival in Romania [VIDEOS]

On This Day in Pink History… 22nd July 2004, Pink played at Golden Stag Festival in Romania

Setlist:

Don’t Let Me Get Me

Trouble

Whats Up

Save My Life

Last To Know

There You Go

Just Like A Pill

Family Portrait

God is a DJ

Misery

Numb

Get The Party Started

On This Day in Pink History… 29th June 2002, Pink played at the Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles on the Party Tour

On This Day in Pink History… 29th June 2002, Pink played at the Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles on the Party Tour

Setlist:
Get the Party Started
Missundaztood
18 Wheeler
What’s Up?
Dear Diary
Respect
Medley: I Love You / You’re All I Need to Get By
Janie’s Got a Gun
You Make Me Sick
Just like a Pill
Lonely Girl
Sweet Child o’ Mine
Numb
Janis Joplin Medley: Summertime/Piece of My Heart/Me and Bobby McGee
Family Portrait
My Vietnam
Encore:
Eventually
There You Go
Don’t Let Me Get Me

Thanks to CLD from pinkspage for uploading the video and providing the setlist

On This Day in Pink History 10th June 2002, Just Like A Pill was released

On This Day in Pink History 10th June 2002, Just Like A Pill was released

Just Like A Pill was written and produced by Dallas Austin and Pink for her second studio album, Missundaztood. In June 2002, it was released as the third single from the album with great commercial success, peaking at number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100 in America. Just Like A pill became her first number one single in the UK, and reached the top 10 in many countries including Ireland, France and Sweden. Although the song was only released as a radio only single in Australia (a physical release was never eventuated), it was a number 1 radio hit. In late June 2009, the song charted at number 97 on downloads, mostly likely due to Pink’s Funhouse Tour.

The song was generally well received by contemporary music critics. NME called it “the third best track off her killer last album”.Drowned In Sound’s Robert Luckett commented that it is “a fascinating record…this is a record with a edge, a kind of pot boiling over at any moment, ready to go off at any time vibe.” He also wrote “it obeys the pop industry’s well-dusted rules for a hit.”Stylus Magazine’s Todd Burns, in his review of the album, compared “Just Like a Pill” to the other singles from the album, “Don’t Let Me Get Me” and “Get the Party Started”, writing “The guitars… sound much more integrated into the work and the overall song works far better.”


The video for “Just Like a Pill” was directed by Francis Lawrence for LaFace Records. The video for the song is considerably different from Pink’s previous videos. “Get the Party Started” and “Don’t Let Me Get Me” were lighter in nature than the dark atmosphere which is reflected in the video for “Just like a Pill”, an example of which is the fact that Pink can be seen throughout the whole video wearing black outfits with naked arms and legs and wearing black hair. In the first scene, Pink lies on the floor. In the chorus she sings in front of her band. She is also featured in another scene with white rabbits around her in a room, and in another scene, she is seen with an elephant. There are also scenes with Pink singing in front of and amongst various people. In the latter half of the video, she runs in a hall whilst lip-synching the song, before disappearing into a bright doorway atop a staircase at the conclusion of the video.

In the video, Pink is seen sitting in front of an elephant. After the elephant had been on the set, she saw the abuse and captivity the animal was in. “Pink learned about the abuse of captive elephants when a trainer brought one onto the set of her ‘Just Like a Pill’ video. She could see that something was wrong and she called us to learn more about the issue. Now, Pink would like to see circuses pack their trunks”, according to PETA spokesman Dan Mathews.

In an interview with VH1, Pink said “This poor elephant…a huge elephant, it’s so cute, and I could see how painful it was for it to get down on its hands and knees, and I’m like, ‘Can we not do this anymore? I think we got the take, you know, it’s enough. The elephant has had enough.’ And the trainer’s like, ‘Oh, he loves it.’ And so I was like, ‘So when were you an elephant?’… I didn’t like it. I won’t do that again. … No more animals.” When talking about the different style of video, Pink said “This one’s very dark and artsy, and I have black hair, which is very fun. I loved it. It’s another part that I haven’t concentrated on before.”

The censored version of the song/video changes “Can’t stay on your morphine, it’s making me itch” to “Can’t stay on your life support, it’s making me itch”, and changes “bitch” to “witch”. Pink’s mouth is only blurred once in the censored version as she says “bitch” at about 2 minutes 45 seconds in the video.

Wikipedia

The song is almost always included in setlists of performances and tours.

Other performances…

20 Years of P!nk – Just Like a Pill

Release History 
10th June 2002

Written by
Pink, Dallas Austin

Album
Missundaztood

Peak Positions 
Austria – 2
France – 29
Germany – 2
Ireland – 2
Netherlands – 6
New Zealand – 2
Sweden – 5
UK – 1
US – 8 

Just like a Pill was written by Pink and Dallas Austin and produced by the latter for the Pink’s second studio album, Missundaztood. The lyrics of the song deal with getting out of painful relationships, with a sub-theme about drug abuse.

The song was released worldwide as the third single from Missundaztood in June 2002 and was a commercial success, peaking at number eight on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States. It also performed well internationally, becoming her second number-one single in the United Kingdom and reaching the top 10 in, amongst other countries, Ireland, the Netherlands and Sweden.

The song was generally well received by contemporary music critics. NME called it “the third best track off her killer last album”. Drowned In Sound’s Robert Luckett commented that it is “a fascinating record…this is a record with a edge, a kind of pot boiling over at any moment, ready to go off at any time vibe.” He also wrote “it obeys the pop industry’s well-dusted rules for a hit.” Stylus Magazine’s Todd Burns, in his review of the album, compared Just like a Pill to the other singles from the album, Don’t Let Me Get Me and Get the Party Started, writing “The guitars… sound much more integrated into the work and the overall song works far better.”

Music video

The video for Just like a Pill was directed by Francis Lawrence for LaFace Records. The video is considerably different from Pink’s previous videos. Get the Party Started and Don’t Let Me Get Me were lighter in nature than the dark atmosphere which is reflected in the video for Just like a Pill, an example of which is the fact that Pink can be seen throughout the whole video wearing black outfits with naked arms and legs and wearing black hair. Commenting on the different style of video, Pink said: “This one’s very dark and artsy, and I have black hair, which is very fun. I loved it. It’s another part that I haven’t concentrated on before.”

In the first scene, Pink lies on the floor. In the chorus she sings in front of her band. She is also featured in another scene with white rabbits around her in a room, and in another scene, she is seen with an elephant. There are also scenes with Pink singing in front of and amongst various people. In the latter half of the video, she runs in a hall whilst lip-synching the song, before disappearing into a bright doorway atop a staircase at the conclusion of the video.

After the elephant scene Pink decided to stop using animals for her videos. In an interview, she explained: “This poor elephant…a huge elephant, it’s so cute, and I could see how painful it was for it to get down on its hands and knees, … I didn’t like it. I won’t do that again. […] No more animals.”

20 Years of P!nk – Don’t Let Me Get Me

Release History
19th February 2002

Written by
Alecia Moore, Dallas Austin

Album 
Missundaztood 

Peak Positions
Australia – 8
France – 42
Germany – 10
Ireland – 5
Italy – 6
New Zealand – 1
Sweden – 5
UK – 6
US – 8

Don’t Let Me Get Me reached number one in New Zealand, number six in the United Kingdom and number eight in Australia and the United States.

The song earned positive reports from music critics, but most gave sensitively mixed reviews upon her self-hating lyrical content. Robert Christgau in his consumer guide for MSN wrote that “Despite Pink’s audacious claim that she’s not as pretty as ‘damn Britney Spears,’ celebrity anxiety takes a backseat to a credible personal pain rooted in credible family travails, a pain held at bay by expression.” Jim Farber of Entertainment Weekly wrote that “In Don’t Let Me Get Me, she turns self-loathing into a perverse kind of anthem.”

Jason Thompson of PopMatters wrote, “on the power rock of ‘Don’t Let Me Get Me,’ Pink herself tells it like it is and attempts to break free from the image making machine. ‘Tired of being compared / To damn Britney Spears / She’s so pretty / That just ain’t me.’ Well, that’s debatable in itself, but the fact that Pink takes it upon herself to call Spears out should be nothing short of revelatory. Spears certainly has nothing on Pink in the vocal department. Pink can actually sing. And damn well, mind you.”

Jim Alexander wrote a negative review, saying that the rest of Missundaztood is full of bad songs and that “‘Don’t Let Me Get Me’ and ‘Dear Diary’ see all pop joy expunged for acoustic seriousness, dreary unobtrusive beats and lyrics about relationship woes and record company badness.”

Music Video

The music video for Don’t Let Me Get Me, shot by director Dave Meyers, depicts Pink as a high school student, in various scenes in which her nonconformity causes conflict with other students and school officials. A similarly-themed scene depicts her meeting with music executive L.A. Reid, who tells her that in order to obtain stardom, she will have to change everything about her persona, in order to exhibit a greater resemblance to Britney Spears, despite Pink’s insistence that that is not how she sees herself. Yet another scene shows her modelling for the cover of a magazine, irritated at how she is being made up by the lighting technicians, makeup artists and other personnel involved in the shoot. The video then shifts to a scene in which Pink, now in control over her career, is welcomed back to her high school for a concert there.

Making the video